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Q & A

Q: How many liters per minute (LPM) should I use? I've heard 10LMP is required.
A: At rest the human body breathes in 5 liters per minute of air. With the heavy breathing of exercise, the human body can breath six to seven times that much air or 35 liters. At 10 LPM we are deficient to cover all the air moving in and out of the lungs. We must consider our EWOT needs not in liters per minute, but in oxygen density of the inspired air. Studies reveal that the benefits of EWOT begin at anything over 21% density of oxygen in the air. For our average EWOT user, we should target approximately 40% oxygen density. This is accomplished by using an open delivery device (such as the OxySport Headset) with the outflow set at three to four liters. For a deeper explanation of this question, view our EWOT Needs article.

Q: What is the difference between a generator and concentrator?
A: For this answer, if you are comparing two oxygen units with the same LPM and purity, there are little differences. "Concentrators" require you to have a prescription to buy one. You don't need a prescription for a "generator." Anyone can buy a generator. Also, a concentrator typically has an O2 purity sensor to advise you when the purity drops too low. This is required of you have an illness and your doctor prescribed a concentrator, which is also FDA registered. If you are seeking to do EWOT, all you need is a "generator."

Q: Can I use an oxygen tank and do I need a prescription? Are your oxygen generators portable?
A:
Portable oxygen tanks require prescription from your doctor because they are explosive. Oxygen generators are not portable, but have wheels for moving around and are used with stationary exercise systems. You can own an oxygen generator without a prescription.

Q: How often do I need to use EWOT and for how long?
A: Consider EWOT as one component of your exercise program. Target three days per week at twenty minutes per session. Incorporate weight training and possible outdoor walking or swimming as additional components of your overall conditioning program. If you are in poor health, EWOT may be your only way to exercise. 

Q: How strenuous does EWOT have to be to be effective?
A:
Only light to moderate EWOT is required to see significant benefits.

This question brings up an interesting discussion point about EWOT. The idea involves perceived level of exertion. When exercising with oxygen, tissues and muscles have higher levels of oxygen available for energy production. The human brain detects the higher levels of oxygen and thus perceives less physical stress. We can exercise longer with greater energy production. The result is increased caloric burn for each minute of exercise.

Q: I have sleep apnea and I use a CPAP machine. Is this a form of oxygen? Can this machine do something for me while I am exercising?
A: CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure. Sleep apnea occurs when airway muscles naturally relax during sleep. The result is an obstruction in air flow leading to arousal from sleep. The CPAP machine provides continuous positive pressure to the airway to hold the tissues open and promote air flow. Normal room air is used directly without extra oxygen. CPAP is not EWOT and can not be modified for EWOT.

Q: Does breathing extra oxygen create free radicals?
A: No. Free radicals are highly reactive oxygen, nitrogen and oxygen/hydrogen atoms which create cell damage through their effect on fats and proteins. Free radicals are not in the food we eat, the water we drink or the air we breathe. Triggers for free radicals include infection, trauma, stress, toxins, allergies and the sun.

 The free radical reaction we call oxidative stress is the result of cellular metabolism. Excess exercise increases oxidative stress. Specifically, oxidative stress is increased when the muscle cell outstrips its oxygen supply and is forced to produce energy through anaerobic glycolysis. Therefore, exercising to the point of anaerobic glycolysis increases free radical propagation.

 Exercise With Oxygen Therapy reduces free radical propagation for each watt of power produced by the human body. Testing was conducted at the US Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The athletes competed in three randomized trials in which they performed a standardized interval workout while inspiring a medical grade gas with oxygen concentrations of 21%, 26% and 60%. Post-training testing was performed on blood and urine. Noted, there was no significant difference between the supplemental oxygen trials and the control trial in serum lipid hydroperoxide and reduced glutathione or urinary malondialdehyde and 8- hydroxyl-deoxygenase.

 It can be concluded that Exercise With Oxygen Therapy enhances exercise tolerance without inducing additional oxidative stress.

Q: How do I know if it s safe for me to start EWOT?
A: The higher 02 levels is not the issue. For many, it's the sudden change in getting exercise. If you have not exercised in a long time, begin gradually, but consult your doctor. If you don't have any health concerns, breathing higher levels of 02 is safe.

 Q: When I use an oxygen generator, what LMP (liters per minute) shall I set it to?
A: 4-5

 Q: What is the best exercise to take advantage of high O2 uptake?
A: The Sonic Vibration systems & PEMF treatment. However, riding an exercise bike, treadmill, elliptical, etc. will be fine. 

Q: Do you need a prescription for an oxygen generator?
A: No. Not with oxygen generators. There are machines called oxygen concentrators which in some states require a license. However, you are going to use an "Oxygen Generator."

Q: How long shall I breathe oxygen while exercising.
A: 15 minutes min. is a good rule of thumb. Longer periods is better. The quickest and most effective method is using a Sonic Vibration system with 02 for 10 minutes a day.